No tiara involved

I recently left Twitter and joined NextVR as the VP of revenue partnerships.
The #WomenOfNextVR welcomed me to their uplift lunch series where Melinda Witmer (guest speaker), Stefanie Yoshimura (software developer at NextVR) and myself shared our stories around the topic:

What is the biggest challenge of your career and how to overcome it

A tiara and cuffs might allow Wonder woman to gracefully extract herself from some tricky situations… as far as I am concerned, I only have a brain, a body and a few connected devices to “do epic shit” day in day out!

So, no tiara involved, here are some resources that I use to do so.

  • Nurture your creativity & confidence in your own time:
    Find and practice what gives you “thinking space”.
    The best ideas often come from unexpected places/ moments. This is because all the work you do throughout your busy work days sometimes needs a spark to ignite the insight that will give you the confidence to move forward with an idea or solve a problem.
    I often find that spark while surfing, that’s when I used to live in Australia, now that I live in NYC, it’s by walking the streets of the city with blasting house music in my headphones, or painting, meditating…
    Whatever it might be for you: cooking, playing with your kids, walking your dog, singing in the shower, doing your hair, dancing, watching cats on the internet, chasing double rainbows…. Make time for it!

 

  • A good read is always a good idea: 
    A trick that helps me read more is to swap social media time for reading time.
    From quotes, to articles, fiction or self development books, here are a few examples I love and find very useful:

 

Oh and one more thing, if ever in doubt about life, listen to the lyrics of this song (it seems crazy, I know. trust me on this one)

React and share your wonder woman/ super man tool kit!

Marie Sornin

SXSW 2017

Recently I found myself running out of books to read so I thought, this year I would approach sharing the learnings from #SXSW in a different way, by creating a reading list inspired by #SXSW 2017 keynote speakers.

Here it is:

  • Absolute TOP read for anyone working in a start up, at Twitter or Facebook, or fascinated by the Silicon Valley:  Chaos Monkey by Antonio Garcia Martinez
  • Amazon did tell me that I would enjoy Disrupted by Dan Lyons based on my Kindle purchase an also probably my average page turning speed, nb of hrs/ day, time to completion of Chaos Monkey , but after attending Dan Lyons  keynote “Ending the bro culture and bias in Start up land”, I can confirm that Amazon is probably right!

All the below are plugs from authors and speakers at #SXSW. I haven’t read them myself yet but won’t run out of books to read for a while.

Marie Sornin

 

Industries of the future

A must watch for anyone who is interested in the future of technologies and its impact on geopolitics, or anyone who has the most important job in the world in the world: being a parent.

If you want to go deeper, I highly recommend the book written by Alec Ross- former Sen. Advisor Innovation for SecState Hillary Clinton: Industries of the future

Marie Sornin

“Pretty soon computers will be fast.”

After my experience with Oculus (which I described in my previous post), this info released at this year’s Oculus connect conference is putting the pieces together and is definitely addressing today’s barriers to tech adoption.

My key take aways are: foveated rendering + wireless + Mixed reality: augmented & social VR

Watch Michael Abrash’s Oculus Connect 3 Keynote Speech and you will get as taste of the future:

To be watched again in 2021

Marie Sornin

 

 

A collision of thoughts

 

I just attended the 1st US edition of the Collision conference in New Orleans.
A 3 days marathon of start up pitches and product demos, talks by founder, developers, media execs and investors.

I focused my time mostly on keynote sessions to get a good feel for tech and media tends.

Here is what I captured.

I am not going to write about the strategic value of data, the astronomic rise of video, the audience fragmentation push and pull game, the importance of native content or the need to experiment with bots, etc…

All these topics were definitely highly discussed but I’d rather share fresh new insights that I haven’t heard much about before.

There are 2 of them.

1- VR is better with AR and AI:

VR was at the center of many many, many conversations. Every company, every start up seems to be involved in some way or another.

It is like we are recreating the invention of the moving image but instead of doing it over 100 years, it is happening in 3 to 5 years.

The impact of VR on our lives, our social interactions, our empathy is (will be) huge.

From the New York Times Displaced documentary covering the refugee crisis, to Charity water story telling, to Cirque du Soleil working on integrating VR into their shows, or recording important moments of our lives with the new Samsung VR camera being released next month….

VR is the next big thing. That is pretty obvious.
What was interesting at Collision conference was to hear about what will happen when VR is here, at scale.

 VR will be bigger with AR and AI (and vice versa)

The potential for VR + AR +AI merged together deepen utility and “enterpisification” in the work place, education and general life experiences…

For instance, imagine a VR experience with voice recognition, space tracking, hand movements and personal data all in one.

You are in a VR experience, you turn your hand up, your emails appear, speak to dictate your response, swipe right  and it calls the person you want to communicate with…

As screen definition improves, processing power speeds up, content creation becomes simpler, new human behaviors that we don’t even know could be possible will emerge simply because the VR echo system exists…

This is a good transition to the next insight.

2- Ethics:

If we are going to create robots and attempt to enhance human genetics and physiological functions, we need to solve ethical questions that didn’t need to be asked before.

I started to think about that at SXSW where I saw a few engineers giving presentations that we were closer to philosophy than technology.

Right now we know 2 stages of life “alive” and “not alive. So where do robots fit in and how we define their missions in society?

Andrea Keay, Managing Director of Silicon Valley Robotics has endless knowledge and opinion about that. Here is one of her previous keynote.

What about the fascinating applications that Halo Neuroscience will have not only on sport performances but learning, education, medicine… how can the device be used without aggravating inequalities?
Is it pushing the limits of the human conditions?

As you can sense, the Collision conference was a great experience.
After 3 days of hyper stimulation, my brain was ready for some relaxing rhythm at NOJazzfest.

 

Marie Sornin