TVxTwitter- #MIPCOM2014 keynote

For those who missed it, here is the Twitter global TV team keynote at MIPCOM

Marie Sornin

Shouldn’t we say “brand experience” rather than native advertising?

I recently participated in the IAB seminar about native advertising alongside other industry experts: @HelgeFelixK from Fairfax, @benhamin from The Monkeys and @acwiedlin from Buzz Feed

Some awesome case studies were shared.

I presented the Jello pudding face meter:

Ben presented Oak reverse robbery:

What do these 2 campaigns have in common?

They create an experience based on emotional insights: might it be disappointment when once can not find their favorite flavored milk in the fridge, or one can’t help but smile when remembering the sweet taste of pudding.

I referred to this quote from David Ogilvy:
The Brand is not just a what you say it is, it’s the totality of what the consumer experiences”

Which I think these 2 examples illustrate very well.

But the best example to date for me is still the Redbull Stratos jump which demonstrates the power of what brands can create when thinking brand experience.

No more paid- owned- earned but a cross media phenomenon that makes everyone’s heart pound…

I also shared my personal experience with GoPro, and how I went from watching this…

… to creating this:

 

So, when discussing native advertising spend less energy worrying about the format, the distribution channels or cost of production… and concentrate your efforts in thinking how you can transform your message into an experience that your audience is wanting to participate in…

Marie Sornin

Cookies n sharks: the new recipe for ad planning

Today’s post is about the impact of social media on ad planning. Nothing to do with the main industry news of the day: the recent and surprising Publicis-Omincom merger.
This would be my attempt at leveraging real time events, pretty lame… I know…

The more experience I build in social media, the more obvious the challenge faced by marketers appears to me… Clearly, the agency<>client<>media-owner trio is not geared to operate in real time. From this situation arise most of the difficulties advertising professionals face in their day-to-day jobs, such as lack of understanding of the platforms, fear of loosing control to consumers, poor content, etc.…

The social media powered world evolves around breaking news, live events, influencers and their clout. For advertisers, it means capturing moments as they happen and turning them into “social currency” for their brands.

How? By introducing the concept of agile marketing.

Attempting a definition, would give something like “create, communicate and deliver unique value to an always changing consumer in an always changing market.

The perfect example of agile marketing is the Oreo daily twist campaign.

Every day for 100 days, the brand hijacked pop culture events and turned them into Oreo sharable content broadcasted via their social media channels. Oreo called it an “ambitious exercise of real time culture jacking”.

The effect: Oreo was the real winner of the Super Bowl with their “You can still dunk in the dark”. Did Oreo spend millions of $ to buy a TV spot during the Super Bowl? No… did Oreo reach millions of eyeballs during the game? Yes! Do people remember & talk about their message? Hell yes!
SuperBowl Oreo. You can still dunk in the dark

The smarts in this activation is that it keeps on giving way past the 100 days of the campaign… Proof is the “sharks in your living room” referencing the recent Sharknando phenomenon.
Oreo for Sharknado: sharks in your living room

So, how did they do it and why is it such an important case study?

They did it by getting their agencies and brand staff to collaborate as a virtual newsroom! By doing so, they transformed their brand planning cycle to “agile marketing”. And it worked!

With the rise of social media platforms it becomes more and more important for the trio (agency<>client<>media-owner) to adapt, react and even create live opportunities to communicate.

I believe that we should retire the yearly or quarterly planning cycles to unlock endless opportunities for brands to exchange with their audiences. The brands that will stand out in the future are the ones able to engage with their customers in the moment

Marie Sornin

An essay on social currency

Guest post by Alexander Southwick– Emerging Solutions and Social Advertising Executive at Fairfax Media

As social media develops to become a mainstream marketing channel for brands, there is a critical need to define the way we measure social success. In line with the traditional measurement metric of ‘reach’, most marketers look to the total number of ‘likes’ or ‘followers’ on their brand accounts as a key objective for their social media activities.
In theory, ‘reach’ should increase the engagement level with brands. Therein lies the dilemma of social networks: a consumer can filter out a brand if they feel they are being interrupted too much (spam). Knowing that the average post on a Facebook brand page will only reach 12% of your audience means that the total number of ‘likes’ a page has isn’t a true reflection of social success. Instead marketers need to look away from reach based messaging, to messaging that is adding value to the communities they are building around their brands: Social currency!

Social currency is a relatively new term that is applied to material being shared across social networks. People deal in social currency to increase their personal or brand standings in the eyes of peers and consumers. In short… something that people want to share and discuss. A brand updating their page with a new viral video gives their users a reason to share with their connections. As a result the creation of content with high social currency will help to add value to the community. Consequently, for marketers to be successful at social media, they need to look to develop content that gives social currency for users to take away and ‘share’, ‘retweet’, ‘reblog’ and ‘repin’ across social networks.

One of the most outstanding example of social currency is the  Red Bull Stratos Jump. It occurred on the 14th of October 2012 and not only did Felix break 3 world records, he helped Red Bull create truly unique and compelling ‘hook’ that people wanted to ‘share’, ‘retweet’, ‘reblog’ and everything in between. With more than 8 million people worldwide watching the Youtube Live stream, the post jump photo of Felix having landed safely has achieved 491,353 Likes, 21,175 comments and 50,508 shares the majority of which occurred in the first hour of it being uploaded! Multiplying the number of shares by the average number of friends a Facebook user has the reach potential got close to 11 million Facebook users. Even by applying the 12% viewing ratio, that still gives you a true reach of 1.32 million! Red Bull associated its brand to content that is so compelling  it became a mainstream topic of conversation. Direct marketing benefits are invaluable!

Creating social currency isn’t easy.
However, by deeply understanding your audience (beyond what they like about your brands & products), identifying what is  most interesting to your fans/followers and potential customers and creating content around it, you will have the keys to provide value. The next thing you need to do is break out of the TVC model and go for a ‘branded entertainment’ production model…. and that isn’t easy… only a few advertisers manage to do this well. The Mary Me Microsoft campaign we blogged about in 2010 and the ‘is it content or is it advertising?‘ post from last December showed good examples. Here is a more recent one: Teaching your consumers something new a in fun way is a particularly good, even if it has a bit of a sombre message –

As more marketers understand the importance of social currency, and consumers gain more power to ignore or amplify their message….  The process of surrounding the target consumer with messaging in an integrated campaign might not hold true anymore. Accurate measurement is critical for social media to keep growing its share in the communications mix. We must re-think how to evaluate social media KPIs and what messaging will achieve these KPIs .

As an agency or advertiser, do you have specific KPIs for your social media campaigns? Are able to clearly measure the benefit they are bringing to your marketing plans?

For more information on how to create social currency read our article “What are the three words that will guarantee social media success?”

Alexander Southwick

Sources:

Red Bull Facebook Page

Is it content or is it advertising?

That is not the right question to ask about online video advertising. The question should be: is it content or is it advertising, do we care? and here is why:

or

So, is it content or is it advertising? Do we care?

With Youtube getting to saturation point (9 to 9.5 mill users un Australia) and the explosion of screen shifting, far gone are the days of the 30s TV Commercial…

PWC predicts that online video is, along with mobile, is to be the fastest growing media category with a +39% from 2013 to 2016 (will represent $280 mill).

A lot of media specialists say that the growth rate would be even greater if there was more premium supply available, more robust standards and measurement…

Looking at it from a social media perspective, I think there is a great way to grow online video presence for advertisers: It’s called Branded entertainment and some advertisers clearly get it:

       Build an extremely strong reach on your own social media touch points (eg: Tourism Australia 3.8 million Facebook fans. It is a lot more than the main catch up TV sites in Australia)

       Create videos that tell a story around your product (preferably with the product not at the centre of the story), grab attention and surprise the audience (eg: Volkswagen The Force

       Broadcast it via your social media community, allowing the main influencers to distribute it first…

I can’t say it is easy to do, but these advertisers have the keys to ignore all the rules enforced by broadcasters and industry bodies around duration and standards, the price tag of premium video ad supply!

I blogged about Red Bull’s secrete ingredients a few months ago. With Felix Baumgartner’s supersonic free fall, Red Bull has once again proven that it doesn’t need to buy media to be on the front page of every major website. So, if you are wondering what advertising will look like in 5 years time… look at Red Bull’s media strategy: Brilliant branded content & cross platform distribution…

 

Marie Sornin

 

 

I don’t watch TV but I do

Some of the work I have been doing recently with a media owner has brought me to investigate the state of the TV landscape, not that it comes as a surprise but, OMG how did it become so fragmented and complex? Watching TV used to mean laying back and zapping on the remote but it is now a true obstacle course through devices of all kinds, ads, time delays, replay, short form vs. long form…
Let’s have a look at what this obstacle course means for the user, broadcasters and advertisers.

Tv1

The user experience is becoming more and more fragmented. The consumer now has a wide choice of devices (smart TV, computer, tablet, mobile) and touch points (free to air, subscription TV, digital streams & downloads- legal or illegal)… the program selection should be driven by convenience but as Nick Ross points out in his excellent post “the case of piracy” it seems that it might actually be driven by inconvenience…

So, to respond to the disengagement form the traditional TV model, and ultimately protect their revenue, networks are diversifying their offering by putting on audience targeted channels (e.g.: 7mate/ one…) distributing their content through digital and mobile channels (e.g.: 7plus/ abc iview- web & ipad…). They are also being more creative in order to diversify their revenue streams. They are evolving the traditional programming and advertising models; from 30”TVC or 15” pre roll to custom content open for sponsorship and producing more and more branded entertainment. An interesting example of this evolution is the Cadbury Tivo sponsorship. Question is, how much audience does it get and is it as effective as in program ads?

For advertisers, it’s becoming clearer and clearer that the potential for brands to leverage content across platform is opening up. Pepsi has recently cracked a new interactive model for their X factor sponsorship with “Sound off”. A digital platform encouraging conversations amongst X factor fans. Comments that receive likes put consumers “in the spotlight.” The most popular comments of the week will be featured in custom 15-second spots running during X Factor.

The future looks even more complex as it’s not only the broadcasters that control programming: TV manufacturers are partnering with content providers for built in content shortcuts & rights. Pure players like Apple TV/ GoogleTV (even Youtube) are also increasing content segmentation… and that’s without even getting into the international giants now entering local markets (BBC ivew/ Hulu…)

Tv2

I won’t drill any deeper in the topic but will close up on another note that, I hope, will get you thinking… “Facebook has obtained the largest slice of consumer attention of any company on the web… The best way to accelerate that growth is to go after the single largest source of attention in America, if not the world: Television.” More at allfacebook

Marie Sornin

 

Making tracks in social media

The tourism Australia “making tracks” campaign just won the 2011 IAB award for social media marketing and picked up best in show at the same time.  The campaign is now shortlisted for the US IAB MIXX Awards.

The Youtube Symphony Orchestra was a unique opportunity to put Australia on the map for a night! The 2009 edition at New York City’s Carnegie hall sold out instantly and generated 15 millions YouTube views on the date.

What was smart from Tourism Australia was to not only leverage the final event at the Sydney opera house and broadcast it on TV or make a beautiful ad out of it but to get the participating musicians to visit Australia! The “making tracks” idea was to pair up one Australian and one international musician and send them to stunning places around Australia to write music based on their experience! We would all agree that Australian landscapes are breathtaking and magical… using them as a source of inspiration for artists coming from all over the world was a great way to associate the YouTube Symphony Orchestra and Tourism Australia! 

 The concept had double benefits for Tourism Australia; at the end of the campaign they had produced:
1/beautiful music tracks
2/ unique branded content

This is episode 1:
 

Very smart indeed when you know that:
1/ most users turn to social networking for exclusive information and not only for commercial offers/freebies
2/ visuals are one of the most powerful triggers for travel!

To me the success of the campaign lies in a very simple insight: you can’t go wrong when you produce quality content!

 But quality content is only the beginning of the story, what made it a success (once again simple but powerful) was the paid & earned distribution strategy of this content. 

The 4 short movies were released one after the other to build momentum towards the final YouTube Symphony Orchestra event at the Sydney opera house on March 20th 2011.

For maximum viewership the episodes were first released on the Tourism Australia website, branded YouTube channel and Twitter feed. Users were invited to engage with interactive features on the Facebook page and via the YouTube Symphony Orchestra portal. The musicians themselves were blogging/tweeting and Facebooking about their Australian journeys. It was authentic and real, so the audience was ready to carry it! Because it was content, and not ads, global media platforms also picked up the films… and here you are, that created the amazing ripple effect that we know: 2.7 million episode views and Australian version of the YouTube Symphony Orchestra final concert generated a record high 33 million views globally! What a great exposure for Australia as a tourist destination!!

Congrats to everyone involved in this campaign for beautiful ideas, music, people and places together!

Good luck in New York!

Marie Sornin