TVxTwitter- #MIPCOM2014 keynote

For those who missed it, here is the Twitter global TV team keynote at MIPCOM

Marie Sornin

Shouldn’t we say “brand experience” rather than native advertising?

I recently participated in the IAB seminar about native advertising alongside other industry experts: @HelgeFelixK from Fairfax, @benhamin from The Monkeys and @acwiedlin from Buzz Feed

Some awesome case studies were shared.

I presented the Jello pudding face meter:

Ben presented Oak reverse robbery:

What do these 2 campaigns have in common?

They create an experience based on emotional insights: might it be disappointment when once can not find their favorite flavored milk in the fridge, or one can’t help but smile when remembering the sweet taste of pudding.

I referred to this quote from David Ogilvy:
The Brand is not just a what you say it is, it’s the totality of what the consumer experiences”

Which I think these 2 examples illustrate very well.

But the best example to date for me is still the Redbull Stratos jump which demonstrates the power of what brands can create when thinking brand experience.

No more paid- owned- earned but a cross media phenomenon that makes everyone’s heart pound…

I also shared my personal experience with GoPro, and how I went from watching this…

… to creating this:

 

So, when discussing native advertising spend less energy worrying about the format, the distribution channels or cost of production… and concentrate your efforts in thinking how you can transform your message into an experience that your audience is wanting to participate in…

Marie Sornin

Consumer insights on steroids

Imagine if you could record your life… that is the idea behind a lot of new technologies and wearable devices. Every parent who has used Google Glass love that they can take pictures of their kids every moment, creating price less memories.

With a much more complicated toolkit, that is what Deb Roy and his family have done over several years. This gave birth to an incredible set of data and later to BlueFin, the technology behind the new Twitter TV Ad Targeting solutions.

WELL WORTH watching!

Marie Sornin

Inside Linkedin

Over all the social networks, Linked has very often been named as “The” one making money and growing faster than others. The sure thing is that Linked has carved a unique market segment and is stepping it up. At the Sydney iStrategy summit in April, Cliff Rosenberg MD of Linked Aus & NZ gave some insights on the 3 pillars that have made Linkedin successful and they will build on in the future

1-     The value of the identity

From its inception, Linkedin has offered its members the opportunity to take control of their personal brands & career development. Linkedin helps its members to centralise a multi-dimensional/ real time presence without them having to put the effort of building a personal profile across the web (not an easy task). It is a pretty compelling proposition for individuals and a very attractive offer for businesses! The data generated by “the value of the identity” is a gold mine for advertising and marketing (just like Facebook), but also (unlike Facebook) for recruitment and business development…
Interesting to know that in Asia, Linkedin is now expanding to “non-white collar professionals”. Linkedin, classifieds on steroids. Why not?
On the side tip from Cliff: “Linked members are 27% more likely to engage with your profile if you have a professional looking photo”… so if you thought a casual pic would cut it on Linkedin, think again and update your profile picture. Wondering if that is also true for Twitter??

2-     Content echo system

If you are a regular Linkedin user, you probably have noticed how sophisticated the update features have recently become. This is the area Linkedin is concentrating on at the moment.
It is providing a platform for 3rd party publishers, corporations, influencers, content curators and individuals to share and connect, therefore becoming a content echo system.
Again, this provides unique opportunities for marketing campaigns and for brands to build their appeal towards the workforce.
The future of business campaign by University of Queensland is a good example (using Linkedin to call members to participate to a panel with Richard Brandson)
As Andy Larke (Comm Bank Chief Marketing and Online Officer and most viewed profile on Linkedin in Australia), said, for him “the benefits of Linkedin are connecting, talking about business and rich content

3-     On the move:

In 2013, 27% of global Linkedin traffic is coming from mobile. Executives are always on the go, which is why Linkedin has built specific features for their out & about experience.
For example, the iPad has a calendar feature; developed based on the fact that executives grab their iPad first thing in the morning: check emails & schedule. With this feature they can view the profile of people they are meeting throughout the day providing insights to build deep business relationships.

Marie Sornin

The best techniques to drive traffic from Twitter – Proven by Conversant Media

This post focuses on some of the social media techniques used by our friends at Conversant Media to best engage Twitter audiences. In just a few years, Zac and his team have become a serious player in the Australian digital media landscape. They have managed to build significant traffic – over half a million UBs/ month – and highly engaged audiences on their web properties: The Roar and Lost At E Minor.


What are they doing differently from other media owners?  

On top of their well thought-out positioning, high quality content and smart advertising solutions, they are forward thinkers, who are flexible and continually pulsing the market.

Those points might seem obvious but I haven’t seen a lot of publishers working remotely and efficiently (we are talking, Newcastle, New York City and Sydney) like Conversant Media. They utilised a variety of tools to make distribution work, such as Yammer for their internal communications and Google apps for team video chats.

When it comes to Twitter, here is some practical advice from Zac (MD), Zolton (Publisher) and Tristan (Head of Content & Community).

1. Time is traffic

Clock

Tweet your best content regularly and around the clock loading Tweets via social dashboards like Hootsuite.  Not every marketer would agree with the following but it does work: rehash popular past Tweets (copying them from su.pr, which archives all sent Tweets in their proper format) to run again several days/weeks/months after they first ran. As Twitter moves extremely quickly, and people don’t ‘sit on it’, like they do Facebook, they invariably miss a significant portion of what you Tweet. So consider pushing more popular Tweets out there reasonably often to put them in front as many users as possible. Ensure these Tweets are not timely though!

Try to break news when possible to give our followers facts and opinion on breaking stories. Timing is critical, especially for sites like
The Roar where a lot of sports information loses its relevancy within hours.

2.  Be short and sweet
Use
Twitter for what it’s meant for, passing information along. Keep your Tweets short to enable your followers to Retweet and add a lead-in message if they want to.

3. Mix and match

 

Mixmatch

Conversant swap Tweets with like-minded Tweeters as part of free a traffic/Twitter growth initiative called Tweet Swap. It provides good content for Conversant’s followers, and also brings new audiences to the participants of the scheme.

Mix up your
Twitter  feed with Tweets that link off to other sites in order to keep your feed diverse and your readers interested /connected with the content that you push out there. An easy way to do that is to use your partners, colleagues, and employees… Conversant Media have a number of columnists (with their own base of followers) and our trio constantly encourages them Retweet content, amplifying the Twitter accounts of each site.

Seek to join debate when possible, comment on blog, and participate in forums with your Tweeter identity.

Try to follow accounts of Tweeps who are enthusiasts and authority around your discipline or passion point.

6. BUT
There is one headache: measurement.


Zac says measuring traffic from Twitter is very confusing and difficult. This is not specific to Conversant Media of course. Evaluating the exact traffic generated by
Twitter is tricky because users consume Twitter streams mostly via third party tools such as Hootsuite and mobile clients, rather than Twitter itself… that’s not all, almost all links are shortened by third-party URL shorteners, such as bit.ly, goo.gl, ow.ly, su.pr … and to add to the confusion it seems that some content publishing platforms might recognise if a bit.ly link comes via Twitter. This is an area which is in desperate need of consolidation.

I’d love to hear other point of views on what works, or doesn’t and how you are measuring the impact of Twitter on your campaigns, sites, blogs traffic, SEO rankings… C’mon and share


Marie Sornin

Big thanks to Zac- Zolton-Tristan