MEDIAWATCH #8: Mexico in 2016

MediaWatch Mexico

Mexico is one of my favorite countries to visit for work and play.
Here are some key media trends for 2016 to 2020

MediaWatch Mexico
MediaWatch Mexico

Marie Sornin

MEDIAWATCH #7- India in 2015

India Media landscape

India was the last (but certainly not least) stop on my Asia tour.

A fascinated market where media transformation is waiting to explode with the arrival for 4G network, accessible and available for everyone.

Here are some key stats

India Media landscape

Download the PDF  here: Mediawatch IN

Marie Sornin

MEDIAWATCH #5: The Philippines in 2015

Mediawatch Philippines

As I continue my journey around Asia, I discovered the Philippines.

I certainly had one of my craziest travel story trying to go to the airport during #APEC2015 summit… I also discovered a really dynamic digital industry. In spit of a relatively low internet penetration (25%-42% depending on the source) advertisers are ready for innovation on digital platforms!

Mediawatch Philippines
Mediawatch Philippines

Download Mediawatch PH PDF

Marie Sornin

Start up thinking// thinking start up

Here is a fun chat with Dan Day, founder of Kinderloop, about what it’s like to create your own start up!

Marie

For those of you out there who are in jobs that are not satisfying or unsustainable

For those of you out there who are in jobs that are not satisfying or unsustainable … (we all know there is a lot of that in the media industry)
Some of you might be looking for a new job, but I also know that some are imagining a different way of working. You might be secretly thinking: “what if, I quit my job and do what I do on my own?”
Well, that’s exactly what I did in July 2011: quit my job as a social media director at Mediabrands and became an independent digital and social strategist for my own business, digitalcuisine

Over the last few weeks, I noticed that outside of the guys I regularly mentor, more contacts from my professional circles reached out for advice. I thought more people than just the ones I meet with might benefit from my experience . That’s how this blog came about.

If I had written this post 2 years ago, it would have been another rant from an over worked, stressed, depressed media executive. Hopefully it will be an inspiration for those of you who want to achieve work-life balance and believe they can build the life they want!

Here is my story:

I was a media agency senior executive, involved in leading blue chip accounts, operating in fast pace environment, managing teams of extremely talented staff, working on sophisticated digital strategies… picture perfect, right? Read between the lines and it also means: dealing with unachievable deadlines and unreasonable clients requests, constantly working long hours, missing friends’ gatherings, sacrificing your weekends to finalise presentations…

Don’t get me wrong, participating in global pitches count as some of the most enriching experiences I have had throughout my career. Working on strategic ideas with agency professionals such as Jerome Nessim (Owner, eclosion.net), Josh Grace (Managing Director, Leo Burnett), Kathryn Apte (Marketing Manager, Youtube), Mark Pollard (VP, Brand Strategy, Big Spaceship), Leanne Brinkies (Managing Director, Zenith Optimedia Melbourne), Andrew Reeves (Communications Director, Naked communications), Jeffrey Graham (Global Ad Research Director, Twitter), Mat Baxter (CEO, UM Australia), and more… has significantly refined my business acumen and boosted my self development.
My work is driven by my passion for the digital industry, but back then I found myself in the grind all week, barely recovering from all the stress during the weekends. I have no one else but myself to blame for letting work creep into my personal space. Don’t we all do it at some point? Is there an alternative?

What was the point for me being in Australia if I was not able to enjoy the lifestyle I came to here for?

Surfing local spot Queenscliff at Sunrise
Just another weekday sunrise at Queenscliff

The ones who know me well would acknowledge how important my morning surf is. When that went, I should have been aware that I was derailing.
I started having serious problems with my sleep and other unfamiliar health related discomfort… I was concerned and sought medical advice. The doctor explained that my physical and mental health were impacted by too much stress and that I could:
1/ Do nothing and it would get worse
2/ Go on a holiday, and then come back to what I was doing with some help from medication
3/ Fix the source of the issue: balance my lifestyle

They say the trigger to change is more likely to be a crisis than a positive response to a perceived opportunity. 2/ was my trigger.

They say comfort zone is where you keep doing what you know and everything remains the same: 1/. That way out of your comfort zone is where you are so frightened you, you freeze: 2/. There is flirting with the edge of your comfort zone, which is challenging and helps you grow. That is where 3/ fitted for me.

It then became clear to me that I had to fundamentally change the way I approached work. That’s when I stopped turning the “what ifs” in my head into “How can I make the best of myself?”

I went through a few months of self-introspection that I would summarise in the following: I am good at what I do and I need to give myself more flexibility in the way I operate. Basically ditch the Monday to Friday 9 to 5, yeah!!
Being a contractor looked like the ideal proposition: work from home most times, surround myself with a tight reliable network of complementary professionals, and be flexible on how I could organise my workload.

With that in mind, I resigned from Mediabrands and had 4 weeks to transform my vision into reality… scary but also very exciting! At that point, I didn’t have all the answers on how to set up a self employed business, what my offering, rate card would be etc.… but I got the wheels in motion and clarified all the technical points pretty quickly.

The self-confidence part was what required more grounding. I looked at the possible tangible outcomes of getting out of agency land.
The fail scenario was: try for a few months, don’t generate enough income, and then look for a new job. In that case I would have taken a few months off and gone back to work to try not to let it become overwhelming again… pretty average but could happen.
Success scenario: work more efficiently, make more money, select the clients and type of projects I wish to work on.
Realistically, I was not going to end up starving with no roof over my head. That was not enough to put my mind at ease. But the penny dropped thanks to the advice of my friend Ariane. Clever thinker, she suggested I look at the situation in a different way by allowing myself a budget rather than a time frame. She said: “You have enough savings right? Start your own business, enjoy your time off work until your savings run low and then look for a job again”
That was exactly the approach I needed! Instead of giving myself 6 months to launch digitalcuisine, I decided to give myself $20K… if my savings decreased by $20k from the day I quit my agency job, it would be time for me to get in touch with head-hunters!

Guess what?
It’s been 2 years and I haven’t reached the -$20K deadline yet! In fact, my savings have grown far more than +$20K… within that time I have also been able to go travelling for a few months and buy an investment property. There is more: I even discovered myself new talents and have become a successful commercial artist!

But enough of my personal story, here is my dump of tips for those of you out there who are thinking about self-employment… (Not in order of importance):

* Plan for the worst but prepare for success: We always think about the worst possible scenarios. Of course you must be ready to react if things go wrong, but you must also be prepared to maximize things when they go well! And there is a lot more chance that you will make things go well than wrong!
I didn’t prepare myself to turn my spare bedroom into an office, then an art studio, to contribute to the most significant digital transformation for the leading news organization in the country…

* Give yourself achievable goals: Do you have a vision for your life? When making a decision, ask yourself if it is bringing you closer to this vision or taking you away from it? When I took on my first contract with Fairfax Media, I gave myself 4 goals (outside of the deliverables of the contract) that would bring me closer to the vision I have for life and help my business development. With that in mind I spent 12 months working hard, very hard to smash my goals, which opened up amazing new opportunities, personally and professionally.

* Be self-disciplined: Getting out an office job and working on your own, doesn’t mean you are going to work less. It is actually very often the opposite. When working from home, you are the only one setting boundaries (no set working hours or location) to get into work mode. Fine if you want to work from 3pm to 1am, the only thing you need to do is to get the work done!
I have given myself a few rules like: Not working in my pyjamas (I get ready for work, just like if I was going to the office, the only difference is that the office is my spare room and that my morning commute has been replaced by 1hr of yoga or surfing), allocating blocks of time for admin & business development tasks (up to you if you want to do a little every day or every week, but don’t ignore them. They are as important as delivering!), giving myself a list of tasks to achieve every day (it’s very easy to get distracted when working from home, but if you know the minimum of what you must tick off. You are guaranteed to at least, have that done!)

* Don’t work for Free: There will always be someone to give you a good excuse to work for free (business development pitch, amazing client….). I recommend you don’t do it. You might think you’ll miss out on opportunities… actually, what you won’t miss out on is delivering work that pays. Remember that the only thing you can sell is your time. If you start filling it with free stuff… guess what will happen at the end of the month??
The one thing I would do for free is speaking at conferences. It is a great way to get your name out there and generate new business leads!
It is also important that you learn to recognize and pursue business opportunities with a real potential from dead leads which are never going to turn into real value for you. I would say, rule of thumb: after 3 or 4 attempts to convert a lead, drop it…

* Join groups: Don’t isolate yourself working at home, join groups of similar minded people. What ever they might do. I was happy to find the Manly Home Workers Association. A small group of local self employed guys brought together by Mark Kelly. We were going for a long lunch, sometimes followed by a group surf on the last Friday of each month. Not only you can meet amazing people that way, but you can also have a fun and might even pick up projects along the way…

* Do what you know and only what you know: Don’t hesitate to invest in the services that you need & will make your life easier: One of my first gigs as a consultant was with Fairfax Media. There was no way I could sort out the legal aspect of the contract on my own. I paid a lawyer to look at it. Same goes for accounting, house keeping (re book keeping- don’t over do it, a simple excel spread sheet might do the trick).

* Watch your time: If you invoice for one-day worth of work, work for one day, not two. Track your time. Communicate with your clients early if you are going over time, and look for options to cover that extra time you need. Don’t think admin time is free… the time you spend doing your admin is time you can’t spend delivering work. It should also be charged!

* Seek advice and listen to it: It is always a good idea to sense check your ideas, presentation materials to people you trust. Be open to suggestions and implement what you consider sensible. That is how I found my business name, optimized my rate card…

* Nurture your reputation and tap into your network:  You don’t need me to tell you how important a reputation is, particularly in a small market like Australia. Be impeccable in everything you do. Don’t hesitate to let people know about what you do and what you want to do… and thank them, when they do recommend your services.
My entire client based started from being recommended by people I had worked with or encountered in my agency life!

Ride the roller coaster: You are going to have some amazing days. New business, great contacts, strong ideas… and the some other days will totally empty, blank, silence, nothing… when that happens, try to stay balance, ride it gracefully!

* Don’t feel guilty: if you give yourself a day off on a Tuesday or a 3hr surfing session in the middle of the day and your delivery is on schedule. Don’t feel guilty about it. It’s very easy to feel that way when all your mates are at work…

* Also, be prepared to deal with late payments, unhappy clients… although it might never happen.

I will finish up by recommending this excellent post: A short lesson in perspective

And listen to “everybody’s free to wear sunscreen” as often as necessary.

Marie

How do good ideas happen

I remember in my early days at Leo Burnett hearing one of the creative directors say: “Luck finds the prepared minds” a quote from Louis Pasteur (responsible the major scientific breakthroughs, including pasteurization, or one of the ways that make French cheeses available throughout the world!). This quote still resonates with me and always helps me to get creative and not frustrated! If you work with creative people, they would all tell you that good ideas don’t just happen, the process takes a while before an idea reaches its full potential.

Creative thinking is one of the favorite parts of my job as a strategist and I can’t help but wonder what if my mind stops??? 

Earlier this week, I attended a networx event by “Ken and Barbie”, as pointed out on campaign brief, Justin Drape, Co-founder / Executive Creative Director – The Monkeys and Simone Drewry, Managing Director of Mango Sydney. They were talking about pitch process that agencies have to go through to win new business, and within the conversations a few good points were made about idea generation. This Tweet I sent during the evening summarizes it pretty well

Good_idea_pic

 They both agreed that you first need to establish a vision. Without a vision, you will end up somewhere you probably don’t want to be. They also both briefly explained how they have came up with a framework for their staff to generate top of the game ideas. This involves, brainstorm sessions, sourcing inspiration and also stepping back from the business problem, office pressure, etc… have you noticed how sometimes, you come up with something that is really powerfull in your sleep, on the bus, or somewhere more intimate…  I had one of those when I went for a run yesterday morning. Psychologists agree that stress and worry, kill your creativity and that your maximum potential can only be achieved when your mind is free and clear. That’s what Simone  meant by adding “magic” in the creative thinking process! Shake up the work environment by having guest speakers, think tank sessions, days out of the office, fun times… Successful companies do that really well.  Google as an example allows a % of Googlers’ time to be dedicated to pro active developments. That’s how Google maps came to life, and how brilliant is Google maps?. I am wondering if that’s a how the wilderness downtown campaign also happened? 

 During the presentation, demonstration of the process was done by Justin who took us through the work done on the Ship Song project for the Sydney Opera House: 14 months in the making, a long maturation time, no compromise between the agency and the client, a lot of passion. This is what it took for those talented people to create something truly beautiful that Australia can be proud of:

 

 

So, remember: stick to your vision, liberate your mind, eat fruits (they are better than junk food to help your brain power!!!) get inspired and prepare for luck to strike. If you do all that, no worries to have, you will become a good idea expert!

 Marie Sornin

What are the three words that will guarantee social media success?

Surely, you will agree with me when I say that social media is a mini revolution in the way people use the Internet. Actually, I feel more accurate in saying a “mega evolution”. In this field marketers can’t assume that users will engage with their brands thanks to high awareness or because they are launching a promotion. Power to the users is more relevant than ever before and this is what makes social media such a complex discipline to master.

Once you’re in, your audience will get in the game (you might not be sure how but they will!). You must lead this game by pushing users to create positive feedback through engagement/ endorsement/ advocacy and eventually purchase intent.
OK pretty obvious, but how? Of course, training, strategic thinking, pro activity and reactivity are all actions that you will need but what is the magic factor that will make it happen?
To me, without a doubt success in social media is linked to three simple words: utility/ value/ entertainment

There are a lot of great campaign examples, such as Burger King Whooper Sacrifice, Tourism Queensland Best Job in the world, Virgin LA-4321, Old Spice, Cannon EOS Photo chain, Best Buys Twelpforce, Ikea Facebook catalogue, Gap Groupon promotion, etc…
Look no further, one way or another all those campaigns are based on one or more of these three magic words! The marketers at the origin of those activations brought to life a strong element of utility and/or value and/or entertainment. On top of that, they have leveraged the fundamentals of social media by letting people own their campaigns.

Firstly, they perfectly analyzed and understood their audience’s social media usage. Accurate insight is the very basic requirement for building engagement. You must know what users do in order to infiltrate and add, improve or influence their behaviors.
They were also ahead of the curve and came up with unique and ground breaking ideas. This is a must in social media: average doesn’t take off.
Finally, because they believed in the power of their strategies, they went ahead without compromising and focused their efforts and resources in developing best in class executions. Unfortunately, diminishing initial creative ideas is a mistake that still happens too often due to the difficulties in evaluating return on investment in social media.

Over the last couple of years a handful of campaigns stood out for me. I have briefly summarized some of them below. As you will see the results and awards speak for themselves.

 

Burger King Whooper Sacrifice

Whopper-sacrifice1

– The insight: the majority of your social network connections do not belong to your close circle of friends and family. Only 9% of your Facebook connections are friends you would call to go out for a beer. This percentage goes down to 3% on Linkedin and 0.3% on Twitter*.

– The business problem: sell more burgers!

– The campaign: trade each of your unwanted Facebook friends for $0.37 worth of fast food.

– The results**: even though Facebook considered the Burger King application to breach the privacy regulations (“de-friending” notification messages) and eventually pushed Burger King to discontinue the campaign, it was a major success.  In about 2 weeks nearly 234,000 Facebookers were “de-friended” for the sake of a hamburger and Burger King capped Whooper coupons to 25,000.

 

This is an old campaign but still one of my favorite! Burger King brilliantly turned the consumer insight into a useful, fun and valuable application, no surprise that users jumped on it and we still talk about it years later…

 

Best Buys Twelpforce:

Twelpforce11

– The insight: customers want to access help service the way that suits them best. 

– The business problem: how to deliver “dream support”? Ultimately the goal was to increase business and customer loyalty.

– The campaign: use the strength of the Best Buys sales specialists and customer service representatives and enlist a legion of them to respond to questions and concerns about Best Buys products and services that arise in the Twitter stream.

– The results***: after three months of activity (supported by a TV launch) the Twelpforce had grown from 400 to 2,200 Best Buys employees. They had responded to over 13,000 public questions, concerns, and opinions. The Twitter feed @twelpforce now counts over 29,000 followers and the number of questions averages 100-125 per day. This campaign won the 2010 Bronze Cyber Lion award in Cannes.

The great thing about this campaign is that Best Buys did encourage their employees to actively take part in the program. They provided training and guidelines and gave them a voice to express their passion and knowledge. Spontaneity, involvement was all it took to get this project to fly… What a useful and valuable tool for the customers, and for the employees!

Gap & Groupon back to school promotion:

 

Gap-groupon-deal

 

 

– The insight: break back to school sales record

– The business problem: break through in the midst of back to school offers and drive more customers to Gap stores nationally.

– The campaign: 50% discount exclusively available through Groupon: get $50 worth of Gap apparel and accessories for $25 only.

– The results****: the volume of takers was immediate and massive: nearly 300,000 purchases on the first day. This is Groupon’s best seller ever! (about 10 Groupons per second).

 Gap is clearly heading into social and geo localization and is putting its marketing powerhouse behind it. It was the first retailer to launch a massive 25% discount on Foursqaure earlier in September and then moved on to this partnership with Groupon. One might argue that such discounts are not necessary and have a huge cost to Gap but I think that the buzz and learnings generated by the campaign will be very valuable for the future of the business.

 

Canon EOS photo chain

 

Canon-eos

– The insight: the photographers community is made of various levels: from total beginners to professionals.

– The business problem: how to position Canon DSLR products at the heart of the photographers’ community?

– The campaign:  photo chain is an online platform where each shot taken by an individual inspires the next. It’s about a community of photographers working together and contributing their photos to keep the chains alive and growing.

– The results: throughout the campaign 18,709 images were uploaded, while photo chains images have been viewed almost 2 million times and 19,271 people signed up as members of the Canon EOS website.
This campaign won the 2010 IAB Australia social media award.

This is a beautiful creation from which emerged an active community. It is a fantastic way to produce earned content and build advocacy naturally. Definitely worth checking out, some of the images are stunning!

 

To finish off, I would say that when implementing a social media campaign, think of yourself as a user. As simple as that: evaluate your idea by asking yourself if you would engage with it? If the answer is yes: define your measurement metrics, set up organization processes within your team, a listening platform and go for it. Test and experiment…. and remember the 3 words, the 3 magic words: utility/ value/ entertainment

mariesornin

Sources:
*Publicis worldwide research 2009
** Adweek
*** Quotes from John Bernier, a Social Media Manager at Best Buys**** Quotes from Julie Mossler a spokeswoman for Groupon