The 3 words that guarantee social media success

My participation at IgniteSydney for marketers was on the topic of the three words that will guarantee social media success.

As you will see: Sex, drugs and rock’n roll is not all it takes…

Marie Sornin

10 tips to land your dream job

Looking back at the Twitter recruitment process, I have put together 10 simple steps I can share with anyone on the market. I am positive this will help you show the best of you to your potential employers.
You can start with watching the video and then read the transcript and use the resources linked!

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1- Constantly build your personal brand:
Just after I announced my resignation from my current position a colleague commented “Ah, it makes sense now why you connected with me on Linkedin recently”. I explained that I nurture my network on Linkedin all the time and not just when job hunting. I regularly connect with people I meet through work and whom I find interesting. I update my status with valuable information and react on content I discover (via Linkedin or other social networks). Not only it keeps my profile visible and fresh it is also a great way to enrich my knowledge and keep tight relationships with people I don’t/ can’t see often (these type of people might be the ones you will ask for a reference in the shortlist of your negotiation…). It is also true for Twitter, blogs, Facebook, G+. This activity is your digital footprint. Keep it vibrant and personal at all times, don’t binge two weeks before an interview… Even better if can top it with participating in industry events, reunions, conferences…

2- Define what you don’t want:
Before you know exactly what job you want to hunt for, it might be easier to start by defining what you don’t want. This will also help you turn down roles that look good but don’t match what you need.
I my case, I knew I didn’t want to go back agency side (unless it was to enter a new market) and that I didn’t want to be in a declining media environment.  With that I mind, I moved to step 3…

2- Decide what you want:
Dream your ideal life and define what job(s) will take you there. Then, think back to define what your next role (the one that will get on track to achieving the dream life) should be.

This will help you target the right companies & positions but also make the best decision might you be in the position of multiple offers, rather than jump for the money, or the lifestyle!

My focus here went onto global and growing tech companies… might they be start ups or mature business.
Of course there will also be an element of gut feel when you make your decision, but at least steps 1 & 2 will validate the gut feel…

4- Avoid the Head-hunter’s rush:
Although they might be a good sounding board to know what is going on the market and prepare for interviews, head-hunters are like sugar! I am not saying to avoid them, but definitely advising to use with moderation….

When you meet recruiters you come out pumped because they have all these great connexions and always promise amazing opportunities… unfortunately that feeling doesn’t last and you often fall flat, when you realize that nothing comes through. Just like a sugar rush.
Apologies if I am breaking some illusions here but recruiters are going to try and push you for the roles they have in their portfolio at the time. Very rarely have I seen a recruiter able to create a role for a candidate.

So, use recruiters’ resources wisely. Only talk to the ones you trust and who know you well. There might only be a couple but the ones who really understand your personality, skills and ambition will offer opportunities that will match what you are looking for, other ones will waste your time and mess up your efforts to stay focus.

5- Prepare for “I day” (Interview day):
Nailing an interview is a great feeling… but trust me, it doesn’t happen by chance. You must prepare for it. Of course you need to leave some room for spontaneity with your interviewers but having your basics covered is essential.

Introduce yourself with impact:
How do you define yourself? I have started using: Marie Sornin= Digital strategist + surfer + artist. I even put it on my resume… It’s short, to the point, easy to understand, well rounded and opens up conversation easily.
Can you explain what you do in a sentence? I define my digital ad strategy director role at Fairfax with “providing expertise to the business to increase revenue, maximise yield and future the commercial strategy”.
Once again, short, well rounded and opening up conversation…

Tell your story: Find the flow to your career evolution. Highlight elements that correspond to the requirements for the job. I find that starting with your latest experience helps from over spending precious time on experiences that might not be the most relevant for the present role.

Prepare to answer the obvious:
About your career moves. An obvious one for me is, why I moved to Australia?
Why are looking to change role?

You might get asked if you use the products yourself, how and why. What do you find great, what can be improved. What is the opportunity for such a product/ challenge…
Prepare for case interviews (click on the linkk for McKinsey interview tips)

Illustrate what you mean with examples from your past positions that reflect the responsibilities and requirement for the role you are after. It shows your knowledge, can break the ice and supports theory.

Do your homework on the company, its milestones, its market, its products, its management, and its competitors, culture and about their interview process of course (Life at Google is a good example)

You would have heard that before but I will say it anyway: Be authentic, be yourself, be honest and open even about your mistakes. Remember this: at the end of the day you will only enjoy and be successful in a role that is made for you. Don’t try to convince yourself & the interviewer…
You might get asked what mistakes you have made, what your main weaknesses are… avoid preformatted answers like I am a perfectionist. Look for meaningful situations where you screw up, fixed them and learnt….

If you have multiple interviews, and if you can, align them so that you go for your most wanted last. The first ones will be an excellent practice run. Remember the questions you get asked and improved your answers. Sharpen your presentation!
I had a week lined up with interviews and during the first one, I got asked what would my first 3 months in the job look like. I gave an average answer. After the interview I thought about this particular question again and refined my answer with building a plan to focus my efforts on what would bring the most outputs and how. Guess what? This same question came up during the interview for the job I really wanted. I nailed it!

Ask questions. The interviewer will ask you if you have any question about the role or the company: ask your burning questions but also prepare questions that will give you insights about the culture, the strategy so that you know what you are in for, should you take the job!
Also, before you leave the room, make sure you are clear on what happens next. This will help you a lot for step 6…

How to get your dream job

6- Stay positive:
After you do interview, whether you think you did well or not. The wait until they come back to you is going to be very stressful. That is why it is very important that you clarify the selection process and time frame before leaving the interview.
Follow up and chase politely if you don’t hear anything with the timeframe provided.
Then, during the waiting period, remember a few things:

There is nothing you can do about it, so step back: Are you predicting the worst outcome? How much likely is it to happen? What will you do it happens?

Remind yourself of the best-case scenario. Mine was: I want to be able to choose the job I want. There were weeks when I thought it was all going wrong, however at the end of the selection process, my most positive outcome came true and decided to go for the opportunity that matched best what I wanted!

7- Negotiate but don’t be greedy
Once you have your first offer, don’t rush. Take your time to negotiate the best package! You must have done your maths before applying, now is the time to subtlety push for what you want. My advice would be that even if your really want the job and the salary doesn’t stack up. Express the minimum you need, be flexible about the package structure but don’t go for less. On the other hand don’t exaggerate your salary expectation. Your remuneration must reflect your ability to achieve the KPIs for the job!
When you the final offer, don’t agree to it on the spot. Take a day to make sure you are fully happy with it, then give your answer!
Lean in by Sheryl Sandberg has some great tips on negotiation.

8- Sign

9- Celebrate

10 – Enjoy the new job!

Marie Sornin

Live blogging from iStrategy Sydney

Spending the day at #iStrategy, global marketing conference. I won’t summarise the keynote sessions. You will be able to find most of them on iStrategy site.  However, I am extracting the common themes I find throughout the multiple presentations.
Amazing line up to start day 1 Ken Segall (ex Apple creative director, the man responsible for “I” everywhere, follow up by Jason Hincks (co founder & CEO of Movember), as well as a Panel of retailers etc…

The leanrings behind their success stories can be summarised in 5 themes:

1-Simplicity is what makes people fall in love with brands:
This was very much, Steve Jobs’ philosophy and how he drove Apple from near bankruptcy to global success. Making users love Apple and its products was all he truly cared about. Why? He turned computer users into Apple fans by making simplicity the ultimate sophistication.
From his experience, Ken Segall explained that being simple is not easy. A pure idea is battled by over populated meetings, negativity current affairs, competitors fighting back… all these currents push you to complexity…  He summarised how to achieve simplicity by a quote from Antoine de Saint Exupery “ Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing left to add but when there is nothing else to remove”.
My French touch says: Simplicity is sexy!

This trend is also reflected in the way retail is changing. Technology is actually making the customer journey longer and ever more complex: discovery> search>buy>acquire>use & share>relationship. There are now more channels than ever before, the role of retailers is to bring them together into a seamless customer experience. In store influences online behaviour and vice versa. The key is to make it simple & compelling. John Batistich (Director Marketing, Westfiled) shopping world tour showed some great shopping experiences from Eataly food theater to Nike wearable devices, Burberry Flagship store and Uniqlo clothes to change the world. From his point of view, the next big change is location profiling. This is simple: bring customer, content and context together!

2-Be authentic:
I have talked about that in many of my posts as it is an absolute pillar of social media success. It came out strongly again in the beautiful Movember story. Authenticity is  what prevents Movember from turning into white noise on the marketplace . How have the Movember team managed to keep their idea growing over 10 years and across multiple countries? Simply (ahha) by putting the fun factor as a priority over raising funds (of course raising funds is important, but is not the main reason why guys join!) and by refreshing their brand every year with a campaign theme that is true to Men’s health. This has driven them to always defend their brand vigorously (selective partnership, not expanding into growing Mos all year long…)

How women can support Movemver
How women can support Movemver

On a side note, I will also highlight the importance of social media. Just to nail the point that social is  taking on search #justsaying: Facebook is the number one referral of traffic and donation (brings 31% Movember traffic and 15% of donation) and is ahead of Google…

Also, when you are Authentic you can do stuff like Scoopertino without creating a crisis…

3-Passion:
Certainly true for anyone who worked with Steve Jobs at Apple, but also true for the Movember crew who turned a mates catch up at the pub into a multi-million dollar fund raiser.
Nick Baker (Executive General Manager Marketing) also talked about how Tourism Australia took passion to the next level by making their 4.2 Million fans the heros in the community. In doing so, they created the biggest, most engaged social media team in the world.
My take on it is: if you are not passionate about what you do, ask yourself why you are doing it?

4- Take some risks:
Confirmation from executives that the only way to grow is to challenge the status quo and take risks.
From Tourism Australia shifting from advertising to socially amplified advocacy. Easier said than done but over the years they have done it! From photo Fridays, to newsjacking the social media team now plays a central role into the communication planning. Their latest campaign Best jobs in the world collected over 620K application from all around the globe. Surely better engagement than a TVC!
Again, Steve Job’s example “here is to the crazy ones ad (voice over by Jobs but that actually never got released) is the best illustration of achieving greatness by not following but leading the way

Marie Sornin

Stay hungry. Stay foolish

If you haven’t read Steve Jobs’ biography by Walter Isaacson, I highly recommend the book to anyone wanting to understand the digital ear in which we live.. Whether you are an Apple fanatic or not,

I think everyone would agree that he was a one of a kind perfectionist and visionary. I am totally appreciative of the man, his business achievements and his impact on consumer technology. However lunatic or hero? I can’t quite decide. Please help me form an opinion…

For those who haven’t read the book, this speech (Stanford commencement speech 2005) is a good summary of his life & business philosophy… highly inspiring

Stay Hungry, stay foolish

Marie