#AskHillary

There is a song saying that the only advise for the future is to wear sunscreen.
Hillary Clinton stopped by Twitter HQ for a Q&A yesterday.
Her advice is to put some moisturizer. And a lot of it!

I happened to be in San Francisco when Hillary did the rounds of the tech companies to promote her latest book “Hard Choices”.

When asked for a piece of advice for women or people considering a career in politics, she said: Find a good moisturizer!
In other words grow a thick skin.

Click on the link to watch:

She did deliver her advice with a touch of humor, which didn’t make it any less relevant.
Here are some of her wise words can be applied to any career.

  • Take criticism seriously but not personally.
    This is how you grow and build confidence.
  • When confronted with a difficult situation, make the decision you think is right. Ensure you feel totally comfortable about it. Then, negotiate and develop your influence about it.
  • If you are thinking about a career change: Try it first, make sure you like it.
    This is very similar to the advice given by Linkedin founder Reid Hoffman in his book “The Start Up of You”. Find your pivot and get involved.

I thought these little nuggets were totally worth sharing as they can be applied to any other context than politics.

I also wanted to give a shout out to my colleagues Katie Stanton who did an amazing job an interviewing Hillary and the SnappyTV crew who live tweeted the key moment of her talk on @Twittermedia

Marie Sornin

How to get your dream job

I recently landed a new job,  not just a new job: my dream job!
Looking back at the recruitment process, I have put together 10 simple steps I can share with anyone on the market. I am positive this will help you show the best of you to your potential employers.
You can start with watching the video and then read the transcript and use the resources linked!

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1- Constantly build your personal brand:
Just after I announced my resignation from my current position a colleague commented “Ah, it makes sense now why you connected with me on Linkedin recently”. I explained that I nurture my network on Linkedin all the time and not just when job hunting. I regularly connect with people I meet through work and whom I find interesting. I update my status with valuable information and react on content I discover (via Linkedin or other social networks). Not only it keeps my profile visible and fresh it is also a great way to enrich my knowledge and keep tight relationships with people I don’t/ can’t see often (these type of people might be the ones you will ask for a reference in the shortlist of your negotiation…). It is also true for Twitter, blogs, Facebook, G+. This activity is your digital footprint. Keep it vibrant and personal at all times, don’t binge two weeks before an interview… Even better if can top it with participating in industry events, reunions, conferences…

2- Define what you don’t want:
Before you know exactly what job you want to hunt for, it might be easier to start by defining what you don’t want. This will also help you turn down roles that look good but don’t match what you need.
I my case, I knew I didn’t want to go back agency side (unless it was to enter a new market) and that I didn’t want to be in a declining media environment.  With that I mind, I moved to step 3…

2- Decide what you want:
Dream your ideal life and define what job(s) will take you there. Then, think back to define what your next role (the one that will get on track to achieving the dream life) should be.

This will help you target the right companies & positions but also make the best decision might you be in the position of multiple offers, rather than jump for the money, or the lifestyle!

My focus here went onto global and growing tech companies… might they be start ups or mature business.
Of course there will also be an element of gut feel when you make your decision, but at least steps 1 & 2 will validate the gut feel…

4- Avoid the Head-hunter’s rush:
Although they might be a good sounding board to know what is going on the market and prepare for interviews, head-hunters are like sugar! I am not saying to avoid them, but definitely advising to use with moderation….

When you meet recruiters you come out pumped because they have all these great connexions and always promise amazing opportunities… unfortunately that feeling doesn’t last and you often fall flat, when you realise that nothing comes through. Just like a sugar rush.
Apologies if I am breaking some illusions here but recruiters are going to try and push you for the roles they have in their portfolio at the time. Very rarely have I seen a recruiter able to create a role for a candidate.

So, use recruiters’ resources wisely. Only talk to the ones you trust and who know you well. There might only be a couple but the ones who really understand your personality, skills and ambition will offer opportunities that will match what you are looking for, other ones will waste your time and mess up your efforts to stay focus.

5- Prepare for” I day (Interview day):
Nailing an interview is a great feeling… but trust me, it doesn’t happen by chance. You must prepare for it. Of course you need to leave some room for spontaneity with your interviewers but having your basics covered is essential.

Introduce yourself with impact:
How do you define yourself? I have started using: Marie Sornin= Digital strategist + surfer + artist. I even put it on my resume… It’s short, to the point, easy to understand, well rounded and opens up conversation easily.
Can you explain what you do in a sentence? I define my digital ad strategy director role at Fairfax with “providing expertise to the business to increase revenue, maximise yield and future the commercial strategy”.
Once again, short, well rounded and opening up conversation…

Tell your story: Find the flow to your career evolution. Highlight elements that correspond to the requirements for the job. I find that starting with your latest experience helps from over spending precious time on experiences that might not be the most relevant for the present role.

Prepare to answer the obvious:
About your career moves. An obvious one for me is, why I moved to Australia?
Why are looking to change role?

You might get asked if you use the products yourself, how and why. What do you find great, what can be improved. What is the opportunity for such a product/ challenge…
Prepare for case interviews (click on the linkk for McKinsey interview tips)

Illustrate what you mean with examples from your past positions that reflect the responsibilities and requirement for the role you are after. It shows your knowledge, can break the ice and supports theory.

Do your homework on the company, its milestones, its market, its products, its management, and its competitors, culture and about their interview process of course (Life at Google is a good example)

You would have heard that before but I will say it anyway: Be authentic, be yourself, be honest and open even about your mistakes. Remember this: at the end of the day you will only enjoy and be successful in a role that is made for you. Don’t try to convince yourself & the interviewer…
You might get asked what mistakes you have made, what your main weaknesses are… avoid preformatted answers like I am a perfectionist. Look for meaningful situations where you screw up, fixed them and learnt….

If you have multiple interviews, and if you can, align them so that you go for your most wanted last. The first ones will be an excellent practice run. Remember the questions you get asked and improved your answers. Sharpen your presentation!
I had a week lined up with interviews and during the first one, I got asked what would my first 3 months in the job look like. I gave an average answer. After the interview I thought about this particular question again and refined my answer with building a plan to focus my efforts on what would bring the most outputs and how. Guess what? This same question came up during the interview for the job I really wanted. I nailed it!

Ask questions. The interviewer will ask you if you have any question about the role or the company: ask your burning questions but also prepare questions that will give you insights about the culture, the strategy so that you know what you are in for, should you take the job!
Also, before you leave the room, make sure you are clear on what happens next. This will help you a lot for step 6…

How to get your dream job

6- Stay positive:
After you do interview, whether you think you did well or not. The wait until they come back to you is going to be very stressful. That is why it is very important that you clarify the selection process and time frame before leaving the interview.
Follow up and chase politely if you don’t hear anything with the timeframe provided.
Then, during the waiting period, remember a few things:

There is nothing you can do about it, so step back: Are you predicting the worst outcome? How much likely is it to happen? What will you do it happens?

Remind yourself of the best-case scenario. Mine was: I want to be able to choose the job I want. There were weeks when I thought it was all going wrong, however at the end of the selection process, my most positive outcome came true and decided to go for the opportunity that matched best what I wanted!

7- Negotiate but don’t be greedy
Once you have your first offer, don’t rush. Take your time to negotiate the best package! You must have done your maths before applying, now is the time to subtlety push for what you want. My advice would be that even if your really want the job and the salary doesn’t stack up. Express the minimum you need, be flexible about the package structure but don’t go for less. On the other hand don’t exaggerate your salary expectation. Your remuneration must reflect your ability to achieve the KPIs for the job!
When you the final offer, don’t agree to it on the spot. Take a day to make sure you are fully happy with it, then give your answer!
Lean in by Sheryl Sandberg has some great tips on negotiation.

8- Sign

9- Celebrate

10 – Enjoy the new job!

Marie Sornin

Inside Linkedin

Over all the social networks, Linked has very often been named as “The” one making money and growing faster than others. The sure thing is that Linked has carved a unique market segment and is stepping it up. At the Sydney iStrategy summit in April, Cliff Rosenberg MD of Linked Aus & NZ gave some insights on the 3 pillars that have made Linkedin successful and they will build on in the future

1-     The value of the identity

From its inception, Linkedin has offered its members the opportunity to take control of their personal brands & career development. Linkedin helps its members to centralise a multi-dimensional/ real time presence without them having to put the effort of building a personal profile across the web (not an easy task). It is a pretty compelling proposition for individuals and a very attractive offer for businesses! The data generated by “the value of the identity” is a gold mine for advertising and marketing (just like Facebook), but also (unlike Facebook) for recruitment and business development…
Interesting to know that in Asia, Linkedin is now expanding to “non-white collar professionals”. Linkedin, classifieds on steroids. Why not?
On the side tip from Cliff: “Linked members are 27% more likely to engage with your profile if you have a professional looking photo”… so if you thought a casual pic would cut it on Linkedin, think again and update your profile picture. Wondering if that is also true for Twitter??

2-     Content echo system

If you are a regular Linkedin user, you probably have noticed how sophisticated the update features have recently become. This is the area Linkedin is concentrating on at the moment.
It is providing a platform for 3rd party publishers, corporations, influencers, content curators and individuals to share and connect, therefore becoming a content echo system.
Again, this provides unique opportunities for marketing campaigns and for brands to build their appeal towards the workforce.
The future of business campaign by University of Queensland is a good example (using Linkedin to call members to participate to a panel with Richard Brandson)
As Andy Larke (Comm Bank Chief Marketing and Online Officer and most viewed profile on Linkedin in Australia), said, for him “the benefits of Linkedin are connecting, talking about business and rich content

3-     On the move:

In 2013, 27% of global Linkedin traffic is coming from mobile. Executives are always on the go, which is why Linkedin has built specific features for their out & about experience.
For example, the iPad has a calendar feature; developed based on the fact that executives grab their iPad first thing in the morning: check emails & schedule. With this feature they can view the profile of people they are meeting throughout the day providing insights to build deep business relationships.

Marie Sornin

Social networks: quick facts!

Update with April 2013 stats:

Key trends over the last 12 months:
Facebook is starting to lose reach (very slight decline-0.18% YoY)
– Instagram shows record growth (+118% YoY), ahead of Reddit (+88.41% YoY) and G+ (+68.68%)
Linkedin & Twitter still fighting for number 2 position but will be interesting to see how things evolved with G+ bridging the gap with these two!
– Not surprisingly Foursquare and Myspace keep shrinking….

Social Networks in Australia (April 2013)- Nielsen netview

Social Networks in Australia (April 2013)

Previous  stats from Jan 2013.

Social_networks-_feb2013

Tracking the growth of social networks in Australia over the last 6 months:
Spotify is the clear winner, strong increase from G+ as well which has overtaken Linkedin.

Let’s keep an eye on the new myspace to see what that’s going to do!

Australian_social_networks_sept_12

April 2012

No surprises in the ranking: Facbeook still dominates (Facebook actually claims to reach 12 Mill users, but Nielsen still reports 10 Mill +).
The interesting trends are with the smaller networks: Tumblr, Pinterst still going strong. Instagram going off the charts (but that was before they got bouth out by Facebook. I suspect this might slpw down and will get rolled up into Facbeook traffic, with the new Facbeook camera), and teh new entrant: Spotify… watch this space, or shoudl I say… listen to this space…

Social_networks_apr_2012

Stats from December 20111

Australian_social_networks_dec_11

Because these stats are always handy…
I will update them regularly, feel free to download!

Marie Sornin 

[ahr-tik-yuh-leyt]

articulate: v. to utter clearly and distinctly; pronounce with clarity.

 

A third of Australian marketers agree with the following statement:

 “There are not enough agencies / providers with specialist expertise and experience to help us implement and manage our social media marketing”

 

Hard to believe with 5,045 social media professionals in Sydney (linkedin search)

 

I think, the statement should be rephrased to:

“As a traditional marketer I haven’t found agencies / providers with specialist expertise and experience that make me feel confident enough to engage my organization into social media marketing

 

I have come to the conclusion that the social professionals who are going to drive the market further are the ones who are able to articulate the requirements for their clients to get involved in social.

This came even clearer when I recently attended two very inspiring presentations:

From advertising to advocacy by Craig Davis-Chairman @ Mojo

PWC seminar by David Meerman Scott– author of “Real time marketing and PR”

David and Craig have more in common than being two recognized advertising and marketing experts and strong public speakers. Before getting on stage, they were both introduced as some of the people who can best articulate social media.

Both of their presentations were structured around successful case studies, impactful statement and pretty pictures!

That’s all it takes for the audience to be captivated, get involved and leave the room with the couple of key take aways that might set their social marketing activities in motion!

 

So, to all the social media gurus out there: do your homework, build your experience and continue to experiment… be innovative in your thinking and simple in your words!

 

Marie Sornin