“Pretty soon computers will be fast.”

After my experience with Oculus (which I described in my previous post), this info released at this year’s Oculus connect conference is putting the pieces together and is definitely addressing today’s barriers to tech adoption.

My key take aways are: foveated rendering + wireless + Mixed reality: augmented & social VR

Watch Michael Abrash’s Oculus Connect 3 Keynote Speech and you will get as taste of the future:

To be watched again in 2021

Marie Sornin

 

 

Owning an Oculus rift: 6 months of excitement, 5 hours of set up, 2 hours on Ebay

 

Before I share my experience as an Oculus rift early adopter, I just need to say that I have no doubt that VR will transform the way we consume content.

I absolutely believe that VR is one of the biggest disruption the entertainment industry has ever seen…  even if the following might not sound like I believe in what I just wrote…

  • 6 months of excitement

I have been excited about VR way before I had my first experience with it.
Thanks to @WSL for letting me go on a surf trip to Teahupoo with Taj Burrows.

That’s why I was one of the 1st to pre order my oculus rift back in January 2016.

Since then I have been playing with Google cardboard and tried the Samsung gear VR 4D ride in the NYC Samsung experience store and was anxiously waiting for my Oculus rift order update.

So last week, when my huge Oculus box got delivered I could not wait to unpack it!

  • 5 hours of set up:

Discovering the product was fascinating. It’s a device of its own.

Just like an apple product, it is delightful to unwrap and discover. The material, the device and its components are beautifully designed.

The rift headset comes with a sensor, a remote control, an Xbox command and lots of cables….

Even though I was aware that it only works with a PC running windows 7 ore newer and with a GeForce GTX 970 or AMD Radeon R9 290 or better graphic card,… Plugging the cables, setting the sensor directly across the rift and getting error pop up upon error pups on our poor PC was not the best fun.

After upgrading the graphics card and testing every possible USB to cable configuration, we were finally ready to immerse ourselves in this new world and leave the reality of our tiny Manhattan living room scattered with cables, laptops, remotes and packaging everywhere .

Then I wen through this 3 stages…

Wooooooo!!!

The Oculus operating system is amazing.
The navigation system takes you into your virtual home, Japanese style with some water feature and a fireplace that you can hear gently crackling in the background… nothing like the cable & PC jungle I was in a second a ago.

Euh?

The visuals appeared a little blurry, like if I was extremely shortsighted… that was because our PC was giving all its power but still couldn’t keep up with how much the rift was sucking out of it!

And then for someone who more familiar with purchasing mobile apps than video game, $40 for an Oculus app (in this case a game) felt really steep….

Hmmm?

After playing with the operation system for a few minutes. My husband’s nagging, who was out of the experience, was too much so I had to let him try it.

So, if you have a crowded household… you might want to think about the dynamics the rift might create…

  • 2 hours on Ebay

With our living room taken over by the mess of VR, we were facing 2 options:
Upgrade our PC or get rid or the Rift.

We decided to put the Rift on Ebay and if it didn’t sell we would gladly upgrade the PC.

2hrs later the Rift was on its way to a state where space is a lot cheaper than NYC and hopefully to a home with a game room and a Oculus rift ready computer.

I loved this experiment and I can’t wait for VR to become a mass product.

It actually has led me to understand Google’s cardboard strategy a lot better.
It is actually with Google cardboard that I have (and will for the next few months/ years) consumed the most VR content, through New York Times, VRse, Discovery… through a library of content relevant to a standard consumer (i.e.: not a gamer).

Google cardboard is making VR accessible to all…. which is a pretty compelling proposition for today’s users and content creators… until the tech becomes accessible to a majority!

Marie Sornin