A collision of thoughts

 

I just attended the 1st US edition of the Collision conference in New Orleans.
A 3 days marathon of start up pitches and product demos, talks by founder, developers, media execs and investors.

I focused my time mostly on keynote sessions to get a good feel for tech and media tends.

Here is what I captured.

I am not going to write about the strategic value of data, the astronomic rise of video, the audience fragmentation push and pull game, the importance of native content or the need to experiment with bots, etc…

All these topics were definitely highly discussed but I’d rather share fresh new insights that I haven’t heard much about before.

There are 2 of them.

1- VR is better with AR and AI:

VR was at the center of many many, many conversations. Every company, every start up seems to be involved in some way or another.

It is like we are recreating the invention of the moving image but instead of doing it over 100 years, it is happening in 3 to 5 years.

The impact of VR on our lives, our social interactions, our empathy is (will be) huge.

From the New York Times Displaced documentary covering the refugee crisis, to Charity water story telling, to Cirque du Soleil working on integrating VR into their shows, or recording important moments of our lives with the new Samsung VR camera being released next month….

VR is the next big thing. That is pretty obvious.
What was interesting at Collision conference was to hear about what will happen when VR is here, at scale.

 VR will be bigger with AR and AI (and vice versa)

The potential for VR + AR +AI merged together deepen utility and “enterpisification” in the work place, education and general life experiences…

For instance, imagine a VR experience with voice recognition, space tracking, hand movements and personal data all in one.

You are in a VR experience, you turn your hand up, your emails appear, speak to dictate your response, swipe right  and it calls the person you want to communicate with…

As screen definition improves, processing power speeds up, content creation becomes simpler, new human behaviors that we don’t even know could be possible will emerge simply because the VR echo system exists…

This is a good transition to the next insight.

2- Ethics:

If we are going to create robots and attempt to enhance human genetics and physiological functions, we need to solve ethical questions that didn’t need to be asked before.

I started to think about that at SXSW where I saw a few engineers giving presentations that we were closer to philosophy than technology.

Right now we know 2 stages of life “alive” and “not alive. So where do robots fit in and how we define their missions in society?

Andrea Keay, Managing Director of Silicon Valley Robotics has endless knowledge and opinion about that. Here is one of her previous keynote.

What about the fascinating applications that Halo Neuroscience will have not only on sport performances but learning, education, medicine… how can the device be used without aggravating inequalities?
Is it pushing the limits of the human conditions?

As you can sense, the Collision conference was a great experience.
After 3 days of hyper stimulation, my brain was ready for some relaxing rhythm at NOJazzfest.

 

Marie Sornin

Trends from SXSW- Day 2

Today I focused as much as I could on sessions about videos with a brand panel about Live videos and  a session New York Times CEO about VR .
Here is a summary of day 2 (and the last day for me)
Live video:
Just one year after its launch at SXSW, Meerkat has announced that it is abandoning live streaming
Many keynotes from SXSW were periscoped from the official @handle of shows/ influencers- check this one out if you are a fan of Mr. Robot.
Everyone is convinced that Facebook live is perfectly set up to be (a) the leader in live video: It’s got the reach/ it’s integrated with the Facebook experience & is easy to use.
Mashable had a big partnership with Facebook Live a booth at the Mashable house.
Periscope is perceived like the best tool, best features and a must when it comes to Live video strategy.
Advertisers love the lightweight/ low production budgets of live video + the fact that the audience is totally integral from to the storyline
Some grey areas for advertisers are:
They haven’t figured out when to start promoting a live video campaign (early is frustrating for the audience, close to the broadcast only brings little reach).
They all agree that it is important to promote live content across multiple platforms: FB/ Insta/ Twitter
VR:
VR cameras are already becoming easier & cheaper to access, however production and story telling still remain very complex.
Cross function collaboration is paramount to execute VR well.
Monetization potential is strong for the future but for now, budgets & commitment are only coming from partners innovation funds and from those ready to take some risks (doesn’t mean budgets are small, just scarce)
Based on the New York Times experience, we are not too far off from citizen journalism in VR. The Olympics might be the tipping point where we start seeing a lot of VR content from professionals as well as amateurs.
Google is fully invested in supported media outlet to produce VR content (Google cardbord + developing computing power & Software?)

MEDIAWATCH #5: The Philippines

As I continue my journey around Asia, I discovered the Philippines.

I certainly had one of my craziest travel story trying to go to the airport during #APEC2015 summit… I also discovered a really dynamic digital industry. In spit of a relatively low internet penetration (25%-42% depending on the source) advertisers are ready for innovation on digital platforms!

Mediawatch Philippines

Mediawatch Philippines

Download Mediawatch PH PDF

Marie Sornin

How to organically grow your followers on Twitter?

I have committed to volunteering at Kevin Richardson wildlife sanctuary in South Africa in 2016.
Until then, I am helping him and his wife Mandy with their digital and social media presence.

They recently asked me for advise about how to organically grow their followers on Twitter.
I thought that the tips I prepared for them, could also be valuable for you.

Here they are.

1- Know who you are talking to:

  • Use Twitter analytics to understand the profile of your organic audience and track your performance over time.
    Go to analytics.twitter.com to activate.
  • Define conversation themes based on your followers traits. You will be more interesting to your reached audience end therefore more users might follow you.

2- Leverage all your marketing material:
Twitter is the best touchpoint to enable your audience to interact with you in real time. Remind them when they see your brand!

  • Your online assets of course:
    • Embed your Twitter timeline into your website:
      This will show your live activity and entice your website visitors to follow you.
      If your website template is not pre built with this feature, click on this link to know how.
    • Same goes for the the follow button:
      Add a follow button to your website and email signature (if you can’t figure this out, just write your @handle with a hyperlink)
    • Try adding call to action to your videos:
      Add a screen at the end of your videos with a call to action to follow you on Twitter (always showing your @handle + a clear call to action).
  • Your offline ones as well:
    • Show your @handle on all your marketing tools: brochures, business cards, leaflets, sales receipts, newsletters T shirts, vehicles, cup cakes,….Wherever people might see your brand when they have their mobile phones handy, add Twitter. Be creative with it, try things out!
      Remember that “Follow us on Twitter” or the Twitter bird is not enough. Be specific, show your @handle: Follow us on Twitter @mariesornin
    • This is also true for speaking engagement/ public appearances:
      Include your @handle in your slides, call out the audience to follow you when you start.
      Get your staff and the conference/ program organizers/ audience to live Tweet the key elements of your speech. Make sure that they mention your @handle and # of the event in their Tweets.

3- Give and Get:

Like in any conversation being engaging is key to making people want to talk to you again.
Twitter works the same way.
When you are engaging to your current followers, they will carry your message out extending your “earned” visibility and consequently bringing you new followers.
There are several ways of doing so on Twitter, here are some important ones:

  • Let people know what to expect from Twitter account: Your photo, bio and URL on your Twitter profile are the 1st thing that people will see. Make it impactful and catchy.
  • Follow people who are important to you. They might follow you back
  • Mention people’s @handle in your tweets, tag them in your photos. They might reply, favorite and RT you (generating a greater earned footprint for your content)
  • Reply to the users mentioning you in a timely manner. They will feel engaged, gratified and will help spread your message to their followers when you need them to!
  • Tweet around the clock: your followers might scattered around the globe (Twitter analytics can tell you that), you must be visible to all of them regularly.
  • Use Twitter native tools: upload your photos on Twitter (links to an Instagram photo will get way less engagement), shoot videos from your mobile, build website cards to Tweet your site pages, try Vines & GIFs.

4- Leverage moments:

  • Insert your tweets in current topics of conversations.Use Search.twitter.com to find the the right #. Use them in your Tweets.

Try these tips and check the impact on your followers growth over time.
Alternate your implementation, don’t do everything at once so you can understand what pushes the needle and focus on these points.

And of course, since I work at Twitter, I couldn’t finish this post without a little push to our promoted products: if all that is working for you and you want to take it one step further, you can also add a Promoted Accounts campaign.

Any other tips that are worth sharing? Comment below!

Marie Sornin for @lionwhispererSA
After all that, if you care that at this current rate Lions might be extinct in 20 years, give Kevin a follow on Twitter: @lionwhispererSA

MEDIAWATCH #2: Western Europe

I just got back from a holiday on the Greek islands, where there is more French than Greeks in the summer.

This brings me to focus my second media watch on Western Europe.

The main part of Western Europe is a politicoeconomic union. The European Union was initially founded by France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Belgium and Germany in 1957. It later grew to 28 member states.
Its most recent additional is Croatia since 2013.

  • Population: 508 Million
  • Internet penetration: 78.5%

Internet penetration in Western Europe by country

  • Northern Europe and Scandinavia lead the way with the highest penetration rates peaking above 95%, whereas southern & eastern states seem to remain far behind around the 75% mark.

Total ad spend by country in Western Europe

  • With 30% of its overall ad spend going towards digital, Europe’s share of online spend is above the worldwide average of 28%.
    The UK records the highest share, with digital representing 50% of its total media spend.
    Italy is at the bottom end with 18%.
    Over the next 4 years the share of online is due to remain fairly stable.
  • Growth will come from mobile ad spend which will triple in most countries from 2015 to 2019.
    It seems that here will be a transfer from digital to mobile spend rather than a strong overall growth.
  • Opportunities for international companies: Manageable cultural gap between US and Europe backed up by large population make Europe good territory o leverage scale.
    Do not under estimate the impact of national language and identity on your communication & business strategy.
  • Barriers for international companies: Market fragmentation and economic differences between countries.
  • Personal observation: As the European Union grows, more diversity & difficulties emerge.
  • Travel tips: Trust me, train can be a better option than flying. Especially between Paris & London !!

Marie Sornin

Source: Internet world stat, Emarketer

An essay on social currency

Guest post by Alexander Southwick– Emerging Solutions and Social Advertising Executive at Fairfax Media

As social media develops to become a mainstream marketing channel for brands, there is a critical need to define the way we measure social success. In line with the traditional measurement metric of ‘reach’, most marketers look to the total number of ‘likes’ or ‘followers’ on their brand accounts as a key objective for their social media activities.
In theory, ‘reach’ should increase the engagement level with brands. Therein lies the dilemma of social networks: a consumer can filter out a brand if they feel they are being interrupted too much (spam). Knowing that the average post on a Facebook brand page will only reach 12% of your audience means that the total number of ‘likes’ a page has isn’t a true reflection of social success. Instead marketers need to look away from reach based messaging, to messaging that is adding value to the communities they are building around their brands: Social currency!

Social currency is a relatively new term that is applied to material being shared across social networks. People deal in social currency to increase their personal or brand standings in the eyes of peers and consumers. In short… something that people want to share and discuss. A brand updating their page with a new viral video gives their users a reason to share with their connections. As a result the creation of content with high social currency will help to add value to the community. Consequently, for marketers to be successful at social media, they need to look to develop content that gives social currency for users to take away and ‘share’, ‘retweet’, ‘reblog’ and ‘repin’ across social networks.

One of the most outstanding example of social currency is the  Red Bull Stratos Jump. It occurred on the 14th of October 2012 and not only did Felix break 3 world records, he helped Red Bull create truly unique and compelling ‘hook’ that people wanted to ‘share’, ‘retweet’, ‘reblog’ and everything in between. With more than 8 million people worldwide watching the Youtube Live stream, the post jump photo of Felix having landed safely has achieved 491,353 Likes, 21,175 comments and 50,508 shares the majority of which occurred in the first hour of it being uploaded! Multiplying the number of shares by the average number of friends a Facebook user has the reach potential got close to 11 million Facebook users. Even by applying the 12% viewing ratio, that still gives you a true reach of 1.32 million! Red Bull associated its brand to content that is so compelling  it became a mainstream topic of conversation. Direct marketing benefits are invaluable!

Creating social currency isn’t easy.
However, by deeply understanding your audience (beyond what they like about your brands & products), identifying what is  most interesting to your fans/followers and potential customers and creating content around it, you will have the keys to provide value. The next thing you need to do is break out of the TVC model and go for a ‘branded entertainment’ production model…. and that isn’t easy… only a few advertisers manage to do this well. The Mary Me Microsoft campaign we blogged about in 2010 and the ‘is it content or is it advertising?‘ post from last December showed good examples. Here is a more recent one: Teaching your consumers something new a in fun way is a particularly good, even if it has a bit of a sombre message –

As more marketers understand the importance of social currency, and consumers gain more power to ignore or amplify their message….  The process of surrounding the target consumer with messaging in an integrated campaign might not hold true anymore. Accurate measurement is critical for social media to keep growing its share in the communications mix. We must re-think how to evaluate social media KPIs and what messaging will achieve these KPIs .

As an agency or advertiser, do you have specific KPIs for your social media campaigns? Are able to clearly measure the benefit they are bringing to your marketing plans?

For more information on how to create social currency read our article “What are the three words that will guarantee social media success?”

Alexander Southwick

Sources:

Red Bull Facebook Page

For those of you out there…

For those of you out there who are in jobs that are not satisfying or unsustainable … (we all know there is a lot of that in the media industry)
Some of you might be looking for a new job, but I also know that some are imagining a different way of working. You might be secretly thinking: “what if, I quit my job and do what I do on my own?”
Well, that’s exactly what I did in July 2011: quit my job as a social media director at Mediabrands and became an independent digital and social strategist for my own business, digitalcuisine

Over the last few weeks, I noticed that outside of the guys I regularly mentor, more contacts from my professional circles reached out for advice. I thought more people than just the ones I meet with might benefit from my experience . That’s how this blog came about.

If I had written this post 2 years ago, it would have been another rant from an over worked, stressed, depressed media executive. Hopefully it will be an inspiration for those of you who want to achieve work-life balance and believe they can build the life they want!

Here is my story:

I was a media agency senior executive, involved in leading blue chip accounts, operating in fast pace environment, managing teams of extremely talented staff, working on sophisticated digital strategies… picture perfect, right? Read between the lines and it also means: dealing with unachievable deadlines and unreasonable clients requests, constantly working long hours, missing friends’ gatherings, sacrificing your weekends to finalise presentations…

Don’t get me wrong, participating in global pitches count as some of the most enriching experiences I have had throughout my career. Working on strategic ideas with agency professionals such as Jerome Nessim (Owner, eclosion.net), Josh Grace (Managing Director, Leo Burnett), Kathryn Apte (Marketing Manager, Youtube), Mark Pollard (VP, Brand Strategy, Big Spaceship), Leanne Brinkies (Managing Director, Zenith Optimedia Melbourne), Andrew Reeves (Communications Director, Naked communications), Jeffrey Graham (Global Ad Research Director, Twitter), Mat Baxter (CEO, UM Australia), and more… has significantly refined my business acumen and boosted my self development.
My work is driven by my passion for the digital industry, but back then I found myself in the grind all week, barely recovering from all the stress during the weekends. I have no one else but myself to blame for letting work creep into my personal space. Don’t we all do it at some point? Is there an alternative?

What was the point for me being in Australia if I was not able to enjoy the lifestyle I came to here for?

Surfing local spot Queenscliff at Sunrise

Just another weekday sunrise at Queenscliff

The ones who know me well would acknowledge how important my morning surf is. When that went, I should have been aware that I was derailing.
I started having serious problems with my sleep and other unfamiliar health related discomfort… I was concerned and sought medical advice. The doctor explained that my physical and mental health were impacted by too much stress and that I could:
1/ Do nothing and it would get worse
2/ Go on a holiday, and then come back to what I was doing with some help from medication
3/ Fix the source of the issue: balance my lifestyle

They say the trigger to change is more likely to be a crisis than a positive response to a perceived opportunity. 2/ was my trigger.

They say comfort zone is where you keep doing what you know and everything remains the same: 1/. That way out of your comfort zone is where you are so frightened you, you freeze: 2/. There is flirting with the edge of your comfort zone, which is challenging and helps you grow. That is where 3/ fitted for me.

It then became clear to me that I had to fundamentally change the way I approached work. That’s when I stopped turning the “what ifs” in my head into “How can I make the best of myself?”

I went through a few months of self-introspection that I would summarise in the following: I am good at what I do and I need to give myself more flexibility in the way I operate. Basically ditch the Monday to Friday 9 to 5, yeah!!
Being a contractor looked like the ideal proposition: work from home most times, surround myself with a tight reliable network of complementary professionals, and be flexible on how I could organise my workload.

With that in mind, I resigned from Mediabrands and had 4 weeks to transform my vision into reality… scary but also very exciting! At that point, I didn’t have all the answers on how to set up a self employed business, what my offering, rate card would be etc.… but I got the wheels in motion and clarified all the technical points pretty quickly.

The self-confidence part was what required more grounding. I looked at the possible tangible outcomes of getting out of agency land.
The fail scenario was: try for a few months, don’t generate enough income, and then look for a new job. In that case I would have taken a few months off and gone back to work to try not to let it become overwhelming again… pretty average but could happen.
Success scenario: work more efficiently, make more money, select the clients and type of projects I wish to work on.
Realistically, I was not going to end up starving with no roof over my head. That was not enough to put my mind at ease. But the penny dropped thanks to the advice of my friend Ariane. Clever thinker, she suggested I look at the situation in a different way by allowing myself a budget rather than a time frame. She said: “You have enough savings right? Start your own business, enjoy your time off work until your savings run low and then look for a job again”
That was exactly the approach I needed! Instead of giving myself 6 months to launch digitalcuisine, I decided to give myself $20K… if my savings decreased by $20k from the day I quit my agency job, it would be time for me to get in touch with head-hunters!

Guess what?
It’s been 2 years and I haven’t reached the -$20K deadline yet! In fact, my savings have grown far more than +$20K… within that time I have also been able to go travelling for a few months and buy an investment property. There is more: I even discovered myself new talents and have become a successful commercial artist!

But enough of my personal story, here is my dump of tips for those of you out there who are thinking about self-employment… (Not in order of importance):

* Plan for the worst but prepare for success: We always think about the worst possible scenarios. Of course you must be ready to react if things go wrong, but you must also be prepared to maximise things when they go well! And there is a lot more chance that you will make things go well than wrong!
I didn’t prepare myself to turn my spare bedroom into an office, then an art studio, to contribute to the most significant digital transformation for the leading news organisation in the country…

* Give yourself achievable goals: Do you have a vision for your life? When making a decision, ask yourself if it is bringing you closer to this vision or taking you away from it? When I took on my first contract with Fairfax Media, I gave myself 4 goals (outside of the deliverables of the contract) that would bring me closer to the vision I have for life and help my business development. With that in mind I spent 12 months working hard, very hard to smash my goals, which opened up amazing new opportunities, personally and professionally.

* Be self-disciplined: Getting out an office job and working on your own, doesn’t mean you are going to work less. It is actually very often the opposite. When working from home, you are the only one setting boundaries (no set working hours or location) to get into work mode. Fine if you want to work from 3pm to 1am, the only thing you need to do is to get the work done!
I have given myself a few rules like: Not working in my pyjamas (I get ready for work, just like if I was going to the office, the only difference is that the office is my spare room and that my morning commute has been replaced by 1hr of yoga or surfing), allocating blocks of time for admin & business development tasks (up to you if you want to do a little every day or every week, but don’t ignore them. They are as important as delivering!), giving myself a list of tasks to achieve every day (it’s very easy to get distracted when working from home, but if you know the minimum of what you must tick off. You are guaranteed to at least, have that done!)

* Don’t work for Free: There will always be someone to give you a good excuse to work for free (business development pitch, amazing client….). I recommend you don’t do it. You might think you’ll miss out on opportunities… actually, what you won’t miss out on is delivering work that pays. Remember that the only thing you can sell is your time. If you start filling it with free stuff… guess what will happen at the end of the month??
The one thing I would do for free is speaking at conferences. It is a great way to get your name out there and generate new business leads!
It is also important that you learn to recognise and pursue business opportunities with a real potential from dead leads which are neve going to turn into real value for you. I would say, rule of thumb: after 3 or 4 attempts to convert a lead, drop it…

* Join groups: Don’t isolate yourself working at home, join groups of similar minded people. What ever they might do. I was happy to find the Manly Home Workers Association. A small group of local self employed guys brought together by Mark Kelly. We were going for a long lunch, sometimes followed by a group surf on the last Friday of each month. Not only you can meet amazing people that way, but you can also have a fun and might even pick up projects along the way…

* Do what you know and only what you know: Don’t hesitate to invest in the services that you need & will make your life easier: One of my first gigs as a consultant was with Fairfax Media. There was no way I could sort out the legal aspect of the contract on my own. I paid a lawyer to look at it. Same goes for accounting, house keeping (re book keeping- don’t over do it, a simple excel spread sheet might do the trick).

* Watch your time: If you invoice for one-day worth of work, work for one day, not two. Track your time. Communicate with your clients early if you are going over time, and look for options to cover that extra time you need. Don’t think admin time is free… the time you spend doing your admin is time you can’t spend delivering work. It should also be charged!

* Seek advice and listen to it: It is always a good idea to sense check your ideas, presentation materials to people you trust. Be open to suggestions and implement what you consider sensible. That is how I found my business name, optimised my rate card…

* Nurture your reputation and tap into your network:  You don’t need me to tell you how important a reputation is, particularly in a small market like Australia. Be impeccable in everything you do. Don’t hesitate to let people know about what you do and what you want to do… and thank them, when they do recommend your services.
My entire client based started from being recommended by people I had worked with or encountered in my agency life! I should make a long list of people to thank here but special mentions go to Brandon Lee & Paul Sigaloff for introducing me to the Fairfax world, as well as Andrew Mudgeway for your support with doing business in Victoria!

Ride the roller coaster: You are going to have some amazing days. New business, great contacts, strong ideas… and the some other days will totally empty, blank, silence, nothing… when that happens, try to stay balance, ride it gracefully!

* Don’t feel guilty: if you give yourself a day off on a Tuesday or a 3hr surfing session in the middle of the day and your delivery is on schedule. Don’t feel guilty about it. It’s very easy to feel that way when all your mates are at work…

* Also, be prepared to deal with late payments, unhappy clients… although it might never happen.

I will finish up by recommending this excellent post: A short lesson in perspective

And listen to “everybody’s free to wear sunscreen” as often as necessary.

Now if, you have had a similar experience, are mentioned in this post, agree, disagree, have more to tell… please get involved  react, comment, share. This topic is open for debate!

Special thanks to:
Jerome Nessim, for giving the chance to be an entrepreneur, Louise O’Donnell for introducing me to Australian digital industry, Leanne Brinkies for connecting me with the entire online media community, Paul Sigaloff for being one of my best advocates. Luke Marshall for proof reading the most personal of all my blogs so far, Andrew Hughes for coming up with digitalcuisine and letting my use it for my business.
All my OTB friends for supporting me through happy and not so happy times!

Marie