Is binge watching the future of sports broadcasting?

F1-drive-to-survive: Is binge watching the future of sports broadcasting

I grew up in a European household with 3 brothers into motor sports. Needless to say that on Sundays, when the TV was on, Formula 1 was on.
However, I don’t remember ever watching a full grand prix, let alone following a season or cheering for drivers, even though the most epic rivalries of the time between Alain Prost, Ayrton Senna and Michael Schumacher were in full swing.

Yet, last week, something unbelievable happened to me : I BINGE WATCHED F1!

The F1 drive to Survive ten-part documentary series premiered on March 8 2019 a few weeks short of the 2019 season kick off.
The brilliant executive producers James Gay-Rees, Paul Martin and Sophie Todd give the audience an all access look at the 2018 Formula 1 World Championship. Its unparalleled footage to the world’s fastest drivers, team principals and owners, as well as Formula 1’s own management team immerse viewers inside the cockpits, the paddock and the lives of the key players in Formula 1.

This show packs everything an avid fan would want in a season of their favorite sport: the action and the thrill, the victories and defeats, the clashes and crashes, duels, gossip, behind the scenes, etc… the difference with a regular season coverage is that it is all available to you on demand and you can (attempt to) fully control your viewing experience.

So, this anecdotal experience made me wonder: Is binge watching catching up with live sports?

Marie Sornin

 

 

 

From mobile 1st to 5G

The annual #NBAAllStar weekend just wrapped up.
Beyond the dunks and three pointers, the NBA All Star is also a celebration of the NBA’s technology innovation. This year one of the key innovation theme on everybody’s mind was 5G.

Interviewed by Peter Kafka, Executive Editor of Recode during the NBA All Star 2019 tech summit, Randall L. Stephenson Chairman, CEO and President of AT&T predicts that 5G will be operational in major US cities in 3 years.

Even if some experts view this timing as slightly too optimistic, with 5G, what is already true for Gen Z will become a fact for everyone: There will not be a difference between our digital world and our real world.

Content will be transformed into new types of experiences; ones that will be seamlessly and contextually integrated into our lives, fully immersive and personalized. Believe it or not, this will all be made possible thanks to zero latency.
No latency seems like an obvious necessity for applications such as self driving cars, but why would it be so important to media applications?

No latency is a monumental change for media

No latency means that 5G is taking data access, computing power and storage away from hardware and onto the cloud… which makes devices such as nReal light, the first ready-to-wear mixed reality glasses possible…. this type of hardware, paired with a 5G phone and network will finally make digital, portable, immersive and augmented live experiences real for everyone!

nReal light.
nReal Light at CES 2019

One finishing thought about 5G:
Remember your landline?
According to Randall L. Stephenson this is how you will feel about your wifi 3 to 5 years from now…
This is how monumental the change brought by 5G is!

Marie Sornin

Source:
* Statista 2018: global mobile video traffic in terabytes per month
** Statista 2017: US TV consumption in hours per month